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How To Make Awesome Mobile Apps That Convert?

A lot of modern development companies state that building an app is easy. Just click on that CT of theirs and allow for the magic to happen. No input, no effort, nothing – nothing at all is required from your side except for, maybe a tight wallet and a decent bank account.

Well, here’s a piece of insider info coming from a software outsourcing company – if someone tells you he can build an app that converts and attracts users without involving you in the process, you should probably start running. In the opposite direction!

There’s not a single company in the world that can make, run and launch your business-oriented applications without your involvement. A third party can suggest tips and recommendations (we do it all the time here, at PreceptionBox), but there’s no way for a vendor to know your business better than you already do. Your strategic and tactical goals are a mystery unless you share them.
So what’s the best way of building mobile apps, really?
There is no silver bullet in software development. There’s no one right way designed to deliver success on a silver plate. All we have are a series of patterns composed of other people’s mistakes we can use along our journey.

Given the patterns are made of mistakes and there are nine failed startups for every successful one, we can separate an appropriate flow for user-oriented mobile app development. It consists of several stages we are about to cover here.

Stage 1: Know the opportunities

Ideas tend to look awesome on paper but, once released they are rarely popular enough to attract a sufficient income. Especially the innovative ones.
No one has understood this statement as well as the guys from Apple. They know what innovation really stands for – improvement of something Android phones already had years ago. They make old features better, shinier, more user-friendly. Engineers from Cupertino take amazing features and transform them into masterpieces by enhancing what already is on demand.
Brilliant!

Furthermore, we live in an Era of Opportunities where all that’s worthwhile is already invented in one form, or the other.

Ok, we are not saying you should reinvent the wheel over and over again by removing the 3.5 jack from it. The case stands for actually improving an existing experience. The easiest path lies in narrowing it down.

Doesn’t make much sense? Here’s an example. We have Trello – an amazing Kanban app for project management. Trello’s target audience is pretty much every company with at least one team. Their reach is a strength and a weakness at the same time. You can’t be broad enough for the majority while paying attention to minorities.

That’s why we have Aha! Specifically designed for product (not project) management, or we have DRAG for simple tasks aimed at time-efficiency and etc. The concept remains the same, yet the audiences are slightly different. Aha! Does not pitch to everyone on the map, but focuses on product managers specifically.

Stage 2: Know your own worth

Now that we have the innovative part covered, it’s time to talk business. Aiming at slimmer audiences with extra service is a great chance to kick-start any product, but, at the same time, you must know if the game is worth the gamble.

You are still in the business to make money, are you? That means you are desperate for a large enough pool of clients.

Here’s an another example: making a Trello-like for truck drivers from California is probably a bad idea. Sure you can easily pitch the crowd with laser-focused solutions designed solely for their niche but there simply aren’t as many of the drivers there to keep your business on the flow. Their monthly fees need to make enough money for you to have an office, pay your team and have enough to invest in marketing, bug fixes and whatnot.

A Trello-like logistics app for automating tasks and schedules of retailers, on the other hand, should do the trick.

We are using the words “probably” and “should” here, because we can’t say much about a niche, without analyzing it thoroughly. Neither should you. Test your audience, run peer-to-peer tests, gather insights regarding the people you are interested in, their positions, income, the amount they usually spend on software, etc.

Stage 3: Find a vendor

First and foremost, you are to pick where your vendor’s from. We obviously suggest you outsource IT to Ukraine, because of the available talent and rather modest price tags, but don’t base your choice on our suggestions alone. You have to be attentive while picking a vendor to get the biggest bang for your buck.

Check for reviews and rates, before considering an app development company. Go through the clients and testimonials they display. Check what types of projects are they handling – are they similar to what you have in mind? Do you like the results on the display?

Stage 4: Requirements and wireframes

Provide your vendor with the requirements, audience analysis and other factors that may affect UI or UX choices. Define your goals, define the actions you’d wish for the users to go for in your app.
The app development company will usually get back to you with wireframes – the blueprints for your app.

All of the buttons, navigation menus and screens will be listed there. We usually design those with a behavioral analysis in mind. Or, in simpler words, we ensure people are tapping the buttons you want them to.
The rest is history

That was a rough start, was it not? All of the stages require colossal effort from your side. And yet, all of them are pivotal to ongoing success.

What comes afterwards though? The usual: agile development with sprints, releases, tests and user behavior analysis after each iteration to reach business goals with the best user experience in mind. These are the stages where you can finally relax and allow for developers, project managers, and business analysts to do their magic. Grab some popcorn, get patient and enjoy the show. You will be enjoying a delightful mobile app shortly.

The rest is history

That was a rough start, was it not? All of the stages require colossal effort from your side. And yet, all of them are pivotal to ongoing success.

What comes afterwards though? The usual: agile development with sprints, releases, tests and user behavior analysis after each iteration to reach business goals with the best user experience in mind. These are the stages where you can finally relax and allow for developers, project managers, and business analysts to do their magic. Grab some popcorn, get patient and enjoy the show. You will be enjoying a delightful mobile app shortly.

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